Pure Naturals Rutin 500 Mg Tablets (Non-GMO)- Helps Neutralize Free Radicals* Supports Vascular Health* Aids in Absorption of Vitamin C* (100 Count)

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How to choose vitamins.

Vitamins for the Elderly
As you age, your body’s need for calories decreases, and the need for vitamins grows. Age-related changes, such as a decrease in the acidity of gastric juice, make it is difficult to absorb certain nutrients. This is especially true for vitamin B 12. For example, the National Academy of Sciences of the United States recommends that anyone over the age of 50 take vitamin B- 12 complex or eat foods enriched with this vitamin.

Older people over the age of 70 need more vitamin D than they usually contain multivitamins (600 IU instead of 400 IU). This vitamin is ingested with milk, oily fish (salmon, sardines). Vitamin D is often produced in combination with calcium, which is especially important for those who do not drink milk or live in areas where sunny days rarely occur in winter.

Vitamins for children
Caring parents often worry if their children need vitamin supplements? Those who eat right – do not need. But, if you face the truth, are there many such children? It is worth supporting a child’s healthy vitamins if: he lacks iron (low hemoglobin); the child is very picky in food and does not eat fruits and vegetables; eating only a limited set of dishes. Healthy teeth need fluoride. The pediatrician will advise how much your child needs. Just do not forget that keep vitamins away from children!

Vitamins for Vegetarians
Some vital substances for the body, in particular calcium, iron, zinc and vitamin B 12, are almost impossible to obtain in sufficient quantities, following a vegetarian diet (especially if it excludes milk and eggs). Therefore, it is necessary to take complex multivitamins.
Those who don’t drink milk should take care of the bones, taking vitamin D and 1000-1200 mg of calcium daily.

Vitamins for menopause
For women during this period, taking calcium and vitamin D is vital to maintain strong bones. And besides, magnesium is recommended for all women over 50, especially smokers and fragile physicians, for whom there is a high risk of osteoporosis. If your joints hurt, you should take selenium and fish oil.

Vitamins for Beauty
Chapped lips – possibly lacking vitamins of group B and vitamin C. Lack of the latter can lead to the appearance of bursting vessels on the face and bleeding gums. A lack of iron and zinc is a likely cause of lifeless hair and exfoliating nails. Keep in mind that alcohol and calcium inhibit the absorption of zinc and iron. Paradoxically, too much zinc and iron is also bad, they suppress the assimilation of each other.
Remember the general rule: take vitamins with food and drink plenty of water.

What vitamins are needed for the skin?

Vitamin therapy plays a huge role in the prevention of ageing. Here are the most basic vitamins our skin needs:

Vitamin A: for sun protection. This vitamin has antioxidant properties, and is also able to withstand photoaging, strengthen capillaries and maintain skin tone.
Vitamin C: To counter free radicals. One of the most effective antioxidants that block the effects of free radicals. In addition, vitamin C is necessary to maintain a normal level of vitamin E. vitamin C is not synthesized in the human body, we can only get it from the outside – with food, medicine or dietary supplements. Being a water-soluble vitamin, it does not accumulate in the tissues, and its supply needs to be replenished daily.
Vitamin E: to eliminate dry skin. It is a fat-soluble vitamin that helps maintain the lipid mantle and prevent dehydration of the skin. In addition, vitamin E is an antioxidant.
Vitamin B1: for skin elasticity. It is necessary to prevent dryness and peeling, effectively combats fine wrinkles and irritations.
Vitamin B2: for skin regeneration. It improves cellular metabolism and relieves inflammation, improves skin recovery after microtrauma, and maintains a healthy color and radiance.
Vitamin B9: for skin beauty. Vitamin B9, better known as folic acid, is one of the most important vitamins for preserving the beauty of the skin: it has antioxidant effect, protects the skin from the effects of ultraviolet radiation, promotes the accelerated synthesis of amino acids necessary for the formation of the collagen fibers, prevents the appearance of pigmentation and accelerates the healing of microtrauma, and also relieves inflammation.
Vitamin F: against pigmentation. Deficiency of this vitamin leads to the appearance of age spots.
Vitamin PP: for skin firmness. This vitamin takes part in the removal of excess fluid and prevents the appearance of edema and swelling, improves blood microcirculation and has a lifting effect, smoothing out fine wrinkles.
Vitamin D: for youthful skin. This fat-soluble vitamin is a essential for collagen synthesis. During menopause, its amount in the body decreases sharply – by 75%. An additional intake of vitamin D can slow down the process of skin ageing, maintain its healthy color, smoothness, and radiance.
Vitamin K: from spider veins. Vitamin K is necessary for the health of blood vessels and capillaries, it strengthens their walls and prevents the appearance of dark circles under the eyes, vascular networks and asterisks on the cheeks and nose. Our body synthesizes a very small amount of this vitamin, so it is better to take it additionally.

Seven essential vitamins for urban residents in winter.

1. FOR IMMUNITY.

The main defender of our immune system during the cold season is vitamin C. When prepared (that is, in pills, powders, or effervescent tablets), doctors recommend up to one gram of ascorbic acid per day. No more – it’s still an acid, a reaction in the form of urticaria, similar to an allergic one can go on.
The best sources of vitamin C: most of all ascorbines are not in citrus fruits (lemon-oranges), as we used to think, but in sauerkraut, kiwi (and in the skin), fresh bell pepper and black currant. It is important that the vitamin is preserved in frozen berries, but is destroyed by boiling, so prepare homemade fruit drinks in a water bath – without bringing the berries to a boil.

2. FROM COLD.

Special substances protect us from seasonal infections – carotenoids, from which vitamin A is synthesized. The higher their concentration, the more successfully our immune system works.

The best sources of carotenoids: tomatoes and tomato juice, persimmons, pumpkin.

3. FOR LIVER.

Inositol (vitamin B8) protects the liver from a wide variety of harmful effects – from alcohol to the effects of medications (antibiotics, hormones). And it prevents the growth of adipose tissue in the liver that is, the development of fatty hepatosis (according to gastroenterologists, up to 70% of adult Europeans now suffer from it to varying degrees for reasons of low mobility and chronic overeating). Deficiency of vitamin B8 is fraught with an increase in blood pressure, indigestion, constipation.
The best sources of vitamin B8 are white cabbage and broccoli, grapefruits, chia seeds, dried fruits, halibut caviar, pike, and cod.

4. FOR SKIN.

Vitamin B10 or para-aminobenzoic acid ( PABA ) protects us from the negative effects of the external environment. And, which is especially important during the cold season, it stimulates the formation of the interferon in the body – a protective protein that gives us the strength to defend against infections. It is responsible for the smoothness and elasticity of the skin, and also saves the skin, and hair from excessive dryness. And this is very, very relevant when the central heating and heaters are turned on, which terribly dry the air in the rooms in winter.
The best sources of vitamin B10 are: hazelnuts, young goat and sheep cheeses, egg yolks.

5. FOR MOOD.

When it is dark and cold outside, we often feel upset for no reason. It’s just that the mood is bad, that’s all. At work, everything falls out of hand, breaks down on loving ones out of the blue. It is possible that the problem is a lack of vitamin B1 (thiamine). It does not accumulate in the body, it is required to constantly replenish its reserves from the outside. In addition, thiamine breaks down when exposed to a variety of factors. For example, it is destroyed by the most common table salt. Therefore, the advice: when cooking foods rich in thiamine (for example, beans), salt the already prepared dish, and do not add salt during cooking.
Vitamin B1 is also completely decomposed by coffee (and in cold weather, we drink coffee more and more often than in summer to keep warm and invigorate). So inveterate coffee lovers should pay special attention to this vitamin.
The best sources of vitamin B1: peas, beans, chickpeas, spinach, buckwheat, beef and pork liver, chicken eggs.

6. FOR PERFECTION OF Minds and bodies

Vitamin B12 has the most difficult name – cyanocobalamin. But its functions are simple, and understandable – it is responsible for oxygen saturation of the blood and saves from anemia, which is very important for those who stay longer in traffic jam than walk on foot. In winter, air is more rarefied, which leads to a thickening of blood even in the healthy people. A lack of fresh vegetables and fruits in the diet leads to a decrease in hemoglobin and signs of anemia – weakness, pallor, and memory loss.
The best sources of B12: green onions, turnips, dairy products, pastes from natural duck or chicken liver.

7. FOR HORMONES AND GOOD SLEEP.

In our body, vitamin D is synthesized mainly by exposure to sunlight. And with a short daylight with him, a lot of stress was exerted by all northerners, including ours. Without this vitamin, calcium is not absorbed, bones become brittle, hair and nails become brittle, teeth crumble, and vitamins D2 and D3 are important for hormonal metabolism, and good sleep.
But here’s the problem, the food from which vitamin D is absorbed is very specific – cod liver, mackerel – you don’t eat every day. In chicken yolks it is also there, but very little. Therefore, in winter it makes sense to take multivitamins, including vitamins D. But only within reasonable limits, without any shock doses, says pharmacologist Natalya Opykhtina . Now the intake of vitamin D is 300-400 IU (7.5-10 μg) per day for children of all ages and adults under 50 years old, over the age of 50 years it increases to 800 IU (18-20 mg) per day.
The best sources of vitamin D are vitamin complexes, some foods (mackerel, flounder, cod liver, chicken yolks, vegetable oils enriched with vitamins).