Superior Source Balance B Complex with extra Folic Acid and Biotin Nutritional Supplements, 60 Count

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What vitamins are needed for fitness.

Vitamins A and B1 are crucial for normal cell growth and protein synthesis. You can usually get them by adding cereals, beans, dairy products, and carrots to your diet.

Of great importance is vitamin B13 (also known as orthic acid), which is responsible for tissue regeneration. None of those involved in fitness need to explain how important this is for muscle growth and recovery after hard training. The best source of B13 from common foods is milk and yeast.

If you are working on a mass, then vitamin B3 is essential for you, which helps transport food to the cells. B3 can be obtained by adding eggs and dairy products to your diet, but tuna meat is especially rich in them.

Vitamins B7 and H are important for metabolism in your body. They can be obtained from cereals and eggs, as well as the liver.

One cannot but mention vitamin B9, better known as folic acid. Without it, muscles cannot receive enough oxygen, and blood circulation also suffers. Folic acid is found in beans and vegetables, but in such small quantities that it is almost impossible to get a daily intake for an athlete. This is just the case when you cannot do without vitamin supplements.

And of course, the “banal” vitamins C, D, K, which are necessary for the health of any person, are especially needed for those who experience regular physical activity.

Vitamins C and K improve blood coagulation, help the formation of connective tissues, strengthen bones. Vitamin D is especially strong in the latter – you cannot build a strong bone system without it.

Vitamin C, as well as B4, which is found in fish and meat, are needed for the regeneration of membranes in muscle cells.

We also mention vitamin B12, which improves the conductivity of the nervous system, and improves the transmission of signals from the brain to muscles. Milk, fish and meat are the main sources of B12, however, experienced fitness trainers recommend taking it additionally.

You need to be careful when choosing vitamin complexes rich in iron. Iron in large quantities is necessary for women. And in men, an excess of this trace element can lead to heart problems. Up to a heart attack.

What vitamins are good for skin.

Vitamin A is , andsoluble
It is the one that will allow the different skin tissues to regenerate or in other words to repair theto see.It is recognized by its name retinol in the list of ingredients of anti-aging creams.
We know that we lack vitamin A when the skin looks rather dry and wrinkled.
To fill this lack with vitamins, consume without hesitation yellow or orange vegetables, lots of carrots, apricots or vegetables with green leaves.
Vitamin B8 or biotin, can also be called vitamin H and it is water-soluble
Among all the vitamins, biotin is the one that will allow cells to be created and to develop, thus making up nails, hair or skin. They are found in legumes, chard, soy, dry yeast, bananas, eggs, or in rice.

Vitamin C is water-soluble

This vitamin is essential since vitamin C is none other than the one that will allow your skin to protect itself from pollution, the sun or even tobacco.
It will promote the development of antioxidants and defend us against viral and bacterial infections. It protects the wall of blood vessels and promotes the assimilation of iron. Its antioxidant actions (capture of free radicals) help in the detoxification of carcinogenic substances.
In addition, we also recognize it by the term ascorbic acid, which plays a key role in wound healing.
Vitamin C is found in citrus fruits, especially in everything that is grapefruit, lemon or orange, but also in vegetables with green leaves or in broccoli.

Vitamin E is fat soluble

Its main property is its ability to trap and prevent the spread of free radicals responsible for skin ageing. It acts in particular at the level of cell membranes and lipoproteins.
It is widely used in high-end cosmetic products. It prevents the rancidity of the vegetable oils contained in our precious creams.
This vitamin is found in nuts, and in all seeds in general, but also in spinach or in vegetable oils.

What about vitamin D?

It is a fat-soluble vitamin, and our body is indeed able to synthesize it in the skin under the action of sun and ultraviolet rays. Hence, the importance of being exposed to the sun, but with caution.
Its main function is to increase the capacity of the intestine to absorb calcium and phosphorus.
Several age groups of the population are at the risk of vitamin D deficiency: newborns, infants and pregnant women, who have little exposure to the sun and have high needs.
Elderly people, especially those placed in institutions, who eat little and who expose themselves very little to the sun. People who do not enjoy the sun benefits regularly or who wear opaque clothing all year round.
Food sources of vitamin D are vegetable oils, fortified dairy products, oily fish such as salmon, herring, and sardines.
Know that the vitamins are small enough to squeeze up to the basement membrane of the epidermis to permanently activate its cell regeneration. Few cosmetic active ingredients have this privilege.

Seven essential vitamins for urban residents in winter.

1. FOR IMMUNITY.

The main defender of our immune system during the cold season is vitamin C. When prepared (that is, in pills, powders, or effervescent tablets), doctors recommend up to one gram of ascorbic acid per day. No more – it’s still an acid, a reaction in the form of urticaria, similar to an allergic one can go on.
The best sources of vitamin C: most of all ascorbines are not in citrus fruits (lemon-oranges), as we used to think, but in sauerkraut, kiwi (and in the skin), fresh bell pepper and black currant. It is important that the vitamin is preserved in frozen berries, but is destroyed by boiling, so prepare homemade fruit drinks in a water bath – without bringing the berries to a boil.

2. FROM COLD.

Special substances protect us from seasonal infections – carotenoids, from which vitamin A is synthesized. The higher their concentration, the more successfully our immune system works.

The best sources of carotenoids: tomatoes and tomato juice, persimmons, pumpkin.

3. FOR LIVER.

Inositol (vitamin B8) protects the liver from a wide variety of harmful effects – from alcohol to the effects of medications (antibiotics, hormones). And it prevents the growth of adipose tissue in the liver that is, the development of fatty hepatosis (according to gastroenterologists, up to 70% of adult Europeans now suffer from it to varying degrees for reasons of low mobility and chronic overeating). Deficiency of vitamin B8 is fraught with an increase in blood pressure, indigestion, constipation.
The best sources of vitamin B8 are white cabbage and broccoli, grapefruits, chia seeds, dried fruits, halibut caviar, pike, and cod.

4. FOR SKIN.

Vitamin B10 or para-aminobenzoic acid ( PABA ) protects us from the negative effects of the external environment. And, which is especially important during the cold season, it stimulates the formation of the interferon in the body – a protective protein that gives us the strength to defend against infections. It is responsible for the smoothness and elasticity of the skin, and also saves the skin, and hair from excessive dryness. And this is very, very relevant when the central heating and heaters are turned on, which terribly dry the air in the rooms in winter.
The best sources of vitamin B10 are: hazelnuts, young goat and sheep cheeses, egg yolks.

5. FOR MOOD.

When it is dark and cold outside, we often feel upset for no reason. It’s just that the mood is bad, that’s all. At work, everything falls out of hand, breaks down on loving ones out of the blue. It is possible that the problem is a lack of vitamin B1 (thiamine). It does not accumulate in the body, it is required to constantly replenish its reserves from the outside. In addition, thiamine breaks down when exposed to a variety of factors. For example, it is destroyed by the most common table salt. Therefore, the advice: when cooking foods rich in thiamine (for example, beans), salt the already prepared dish, and do not add salt during cooking.
Vitamin B1 is also completely decomposed by coffee (and in cold weather, we drink coffee more and more often than in summer to keep warm and invigorate). So inveterate coffee lovers should pay special attention to this vitamin.
The best sources of vitamin B1: peas, beans, chickpeas, spinach, buckwheat, beef and pork liver, chicken eggs.

6. FOR PERFECTION OF Minds and bodies

Vitamin B12 has the most difficult name – cyanocobalamin. But its functions are simple, and understandable – it is responsible for oxygen saturation of the blood and saves from anemia, which is very important for those who stay longer in traffic jam than walk on foot. In winter, air is more rarefied, which leads to a thickening of blood even in the healthy people. A lack of fresh vegetables and fruits in the diet leads to a decrease in hemoglobin and signs of anemia – weakness, pallor, and memory loss.
The best sources of B12: green onions, turnips, dairy products, pastes from natural duck or chicken liver.

7. FOR HORMONES AND GOOD SLEEP.

In our body, vitamin D is synthesized mainly by exposure to sunlight. And with a short daylight with him, a lot of stress was exerted by all northerners, including ours. Without this vitamin, calcium is not absorbed, bones become brittle, hair and nails become brittle, teeth crumble, and vitamins D2 and D3 are important for hormonal metabolism, and good sleep.
But here’s the problem, the food from which vitamin D is absorbed is very specific – cod liver, mackerel – you don’t eat every day. In chicken yolks it is also there, but very little. Therefore, in winter it makes sense to take multivitamins, including vitamins D. But only within reasonable limits, without any shock doses, says pharmacologist Natalya Opykhtina . Now the intake of vitamin D is 300-400 IU (7.5-10 μg) per day for children of all ages and adults under 50 years old, over the age of 50 years it increases to 800 IU (18-20 mg) per day.
The best sources of vitamin D are vitamin complexes, some foods (mackerel, flounder, cod liver, chicken yolks, vegetable oils enriched with vitamins).